Published: September 9, 2019 By: Carol Anne Stares

Commuters on bicycle in the city.In the summer many Canadians are on the move; whether it’s running, walking or cycling, people from coast to coast are taking advantage of the warm weather to enjoy the outdoors and stay active. On August 8th, the UK celebrates Cycle to Work Day – one of the biggest cycle commuting events in the region. Across the globe, people recognize the uniqueness, longevity and versatility of the bicycle. It’s been used for centuries; it is simple, affordable, reliable and an eco-friendly means of transportation. June 3rd is recognized as International World Bicycle Day; many cities in Canada celebrate the day – and even the month – with bike to work challenges.

In May this year, McIntosh Perry’s Carp office participated in Bike to Work Month and together we made a huge impact across the city. There were over 4,000 participants total; 313 teams, 488,716 kms logged and 125 tonnes of green house gas averted! Many of our staff use bicycles as either a mode of transportation or for leisure rides while enjoying the summer weather. When they clip in and head out through the park, or navigate their way through a busy intersection, our staff are proud that McIntosh Perry has helped contribute to building sustainable active transportation facilities across the country.

Woodfield Connection

Our Municipal and Transportation groups have been busy working on a variety of active transportation projects in the City of Ottawa, Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA) and for the Ministry of Transportation (MTO).

In Ottawa, our Municipal team’s first project with the city more than 10 years ago was an active transportation project. This paved the way for the us to work on many other projects, as the city began to invest more in active transportation. In 2019, the team just finished the Nepean Trail Cycling project which involved construction of more than 5km of various cycling facilities, including on-street buffered lanes, shared lanes, shared roadways, multi-use pathways, cycle tracks and intersection cross-rides.

In Old Ottawa South, McIntosh Perry is currently working on a critical crossride design that connects the adjacent neighbourhood to a major pathway that runs along the Rideau Canal, a huge enhancement for the community and for pedestrian and cyclist safety crossing busy Colonel By Drive.

Colonnade CrossrideIn the GTHA, our Municipal team is finalizing the design for almost 3km of multi-use pathways and cross-rides along John Street in the city of Markham. McIntosh Perry also just completed a trail feasibility study for Markham, which aims to provide better connectivity of active transportation infrastructure across the city.

At the provincial level, the team has been working on the design and implementation of active transportation facilities within interchanges and major facilities in the GTHA.

With an increased focus on green infrastructure and bikeable/walkable communities as a means of promoting public health and improving the environment, active transportation facilities have been elevated to greater importance as a necessary component of the overall transportation system.

McIntosh Perry’s work at various Highway 400, Highway 404 and Highway 401 interchanges will see the implementation of separated cycling facilities as well as improvements to the existing sidewalk network. The design also explores how various cycling facilities can be accommodated within the existing platform as well as cycling facilities that require roadway/structure widening across the 400 series highways. For more on this project, follow McIntosh Perry’s Transportation Planning team as they present this project at the 2019 TAC Joint Conference and Exhibition in Halifax from September 22-25.

McIntosh Perry’s Transportation Planning team was also busy promoting cycling in the City of Ottawa at the annual CITE Conference back in June. We sponsored a cycling tour through downtown Ottawa and Gatineau, which sampled cycling facilities including the Corktown footbridge, Laurier Avenue segregated bike lanes, and the bikeway treatment across the Portage Bridge. The tour continued to the City of Gatineau for a spin around the new pedestrianized space along Laval Street and the multi-use pathways leading to Gatineau Park, a popular cycling/hiking destination just north of the nation’s capital.

The next time you get on your bike as you commute to work or ride to the park on the weekend, McIntosh Perry may have played a part in the active transportation infrastructure that got you there.

Happy Cycling!